Science news

Feedback: Taking Einstein's name in vain

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2014-09-12 12:00
Delusions of gravitas, we request help collecting Einstein fakes, egregious Ebola exploitation and more (full text available to subscribers)






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Twin solar storms arrive at Earth

Guardian Science - Fri, 2014-09-12 03:55

Space weather experts say double event unlikely to cause problems but alert issued to power and communication networks

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Quantum control: How weird do you want it?

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2014-09-11 20:00
Entanglement used to be the gold standard of the quantum world's weirdness, now a new and noisy phenomenon could give us all the benefits with less of the fuss (full text available to subscribers)






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Quasicrystal quest: The unreal rock that nature made

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2014-09-11 20:00
How did a mystery mineral acquire remarkable properties not mimicked in the lab until 30 years ago? Finding out took one cosmologist to the ends of the Earth (full text available to subscribers)






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Giant predatory dinosaur Spinosaurus was scourge of prehistoric rivers

Guardian Science - Thu, 2014-09-11 19:00

Fossil remains found in Morocco add to evidence that huge meat-eating Spinosaurus spent most of its time in water

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Springy ceramics bounce back when squeezed

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2014-09-11 19:00
Ceramics break rather than bend under pressure, but nano-lattices have been used to produce resilient ceramics that could help make ultralight, tough materials
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Biggest hunting dinosaur was an aquatic shark-gobbler

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2014-09-11 19:00
Spinosaurus was the only dinosaur to spend most of its time in the water. It lurked in mangrove swamps and may have swallowed sharks whole
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Sleeping brains can process and respond to words

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2014-09-11 18:21
Our brains can categorise words and prepare physical responses to them while we sleep, highlighting just how awake some of our brain regions are as we slumber
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Scientist who identified Ebola virus calls for 'quasi-military intervention'

Guardian Science - Thu, 2014-09-11 18:12
London-based microbiologist Prof Peter Piot urges creation of UN peacekeeping force to fight 'catastrophe' in west Africa Continue reading...






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Rubber duck comet photobombs Rosetta probe's selfie

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2014-09-11 18:00
The spacecraft aiming to be the first to park a lander on a comet has snapped a self-portrait – with its quirkily shaped target in the background
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The brutal oppression of the Nerds and the Geeks

Guardian Science - Thu, 2014-09-11 12:18

The use of the term nerd doesnt quite match the terrible history of the n-word, despite what some people might say

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The banality of evil? People aren't so easily led

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2014-09-11 12:18
The problem of why ordinary people do appalling things has vexed scholars for centuries, but outmoded ideas won't help counter modern radicalisation
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Lost frogs: finding the world's rarest amphibians in pictures

Guardian Science - Thu, 2014-09-11 11:29

In Search of Lost Frogs is the story of conservationist and photographer Robin Moores journey from Colombia to Costa Rica and Israel to India to find lost species, a quest he embarked upon later joined by 126 researchers in 21 countries in 2010. He has founded the Amphibian Survival Alliance and is a fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers. The expedition and its discoveries give hope that it is still not too late to save some species, and they are all remarkable as is illustrated by Moores stunning photographs here

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Low gravity makes astronauts prone to falling over

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2014-09-11 10:11
We need to feel a certain gravitational force to tell up from down, which has big implications for the design of objects for bases on other planets
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Your shopping comes from illegally deforested land

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2014-09-11 00:01
Commercial plantations and food companies are the biggest cause of tropical deforestation, and many of the resulting products end up in Western supermarkets
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Woman of 24 found to have no cerebellum in her brain

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2014-09-10 18:00
A 24-year-old woman has discovered that her cerebellum is completely missing, explaining some of the unusual problems she has had with movement and speech
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Why Westerners are driven to join the jihadist fight

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2014-09-10 18:00
Forget indoctrination, people become foreign fighters in Syria and Iraq for far simpler reasons: politics, persecution and peer-group pressure






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Shattering DNA may have let gibbons evolve new species

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2014-09-10 18:00
The gibbon genome contains weird bits of DNA that have been completely reshuffled. This dramatic rewriting of genes may have created new species of gibbon






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Today on New Scientist

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2014-09-10 17:45
All the latest stories on newscientist.com: paralysis horror of waking in surgery, more Stonehenge monuments discovered, Japan redoubles whaling efforts, new fossil reptile, and more






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