Science news

Chris Hadfield: Guardian live interview - video

Guardian Science - Fri, 2014-12-12 14:38
The Canadian astronaut talks to Guardian science editor Ian Sample about flying to Mars, going blind in space and his first view of the Earth. Commander Hadfield was speaking at a Guardian Live event at the Royal Geographic Society in December 2014. Find out about upcoming Guardian Live events and debates and how to sign up as a member Continue reading...
Categories: Science news

The sites that know your dream job before you do

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2014-12-12 13:00
We use algorithms to connect to people and things we'll love, like suggestions on Netflix – soon they might connect us to jobs we'll love too






Categories: Science news

How to say om nom nom in Hungarian, and other onomatopoeic insights

Guardian Science - Fri, 2014-12-12 12:14

All languages have words that imitate sounds in the real world. But how does a French dog bark, and a Turkish duck quack?

Continue reading...
Categories: Science news

Feedback: Weight of evidence of error

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2014-12-12 12:00
Reviewers' proofread fail, plucky little lander plot, they took rockets for a walk and more (full text available to subscribers)






Categories: Science news

Your telltale video camera shake can identify you

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2014-12-12 11:34
Footage captured on wearable cameras contains a motion signature unique to you – protestors and police alike should beware






Categories: Science news

Stamping out online abuse is a job for all of us

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2014-12-12 08:00
Governments, tech giants and individuals must act together if we are to clamp down on threats and abuse in the digital world






Categories: Science news

Why whale poo matters

Guardian Science - Fri, 2014-12-12 07:00

Not only does nutrient-rich whale poo help reverse the effects of climate change – it’s a remarkable example that nothing in the natural world occurs in isolation

Continue reading...
Categories: Science news

Hangover severity may be partly genetic

Guardian Science - Fri, 2014-12-12 06:30

Alcohol researcher Sally Adams investigates recent research suggesting that a tendency to experience horrendous hangovers is partially inherited

Continue reading...
Categories: Science news

Egyptian mummy removed from coffin for first time in 2,300 years

Guardian Science - Fri, 2014-12-12 05:00

Conservation efforts begin on body of 14-year-old Minirdis, found in 19th century at Nile burial site and brought to the Chicago Field Museum in the 1920s

Continue reading...
Categories: Science news

Santa Claus deniers: why do they get so much airtime?

Guardian Science - Fri, 2014-12-12 03:12

A comedian runs into trouble when she states on television, repeatedly, that Santa is not real. Why are deniers given so many high-profile platforms to spout their views when the scientific evidence for Santa is so overwhelming?

Continue reading...
Categories: Science news

How to think about… Space-time

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2014-12-12 03:00
It has often been described as a rubber sheet, but Einstein's twisted space-time is more intangible than that (full text available to subscribers)






Categories: Science news

Great wall of trees keeps China's deserts at bay

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2014-12-12 02:00
Millions of trees planted in northern China are taming dust storms, but critics wonder whether the Great Green Wall is a long-term solution






Categories: Science news

Peer inside the head of a giant prehistoric groundhog

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2014-12-11 20:30
A virtual replica of the first complete skull of a mysterious mammal is revealing the structure of its bizarre bones






Categories: Science news

This means spore: The brutal world of fighting fungi

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2014-12-11 20:00
Single combat, assassination, chemical warfare, even mind control: the Geneva conventions don't apply when fungi go to war (full text available to subscribers)






Categories: Science news

Sprouting feathers and lost teeth: scientists map the evolution of birds

Guardian Science - Thu, 2014-12-11 19:16
Mass genome sequencing reveals avian family tree – and how imitative birdsong gives birds genetic similarities to humans

A remarkable international effort to map out the avian tree of life has revealed how birds evolved after the mass extinction that wiped out the dinosaurs into more than 10,000 species alive today. More than 200 scientists in 20 countries joined forces to create the evolutionary tree, which reveals how birds gained their colourful feathers, lost their teeth, and learned to sing songs.

The project has thrown up extraordinary similarities between the brain circuits that allow humans to speak and those that give some birds song: a case of common biology being arrived at via different evolutionary routes.

Continue reading...
Categories: Science news

Warming won't give emperor penguins happy feet

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2014-12-11 19:00
Genome analysis of the two Antarctic-breeding penguins reveal the differing fate global warming might have on the iconic emperors and Adélies






Categories: Science news

Humans and birds share the same singing genes

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2014-12-11 19:00
An intriguing evolutionary similarity might mean that songbirds will make good models for studying the genetics of speech disorders






Categories: Science news

Loops and folds of our DNA to shed light on disease

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2014-12-11 18:25
Stretched out, our DNA is almost 2 metres long. The way it folds in on itself to fit into our cells is now being mapped – and has been dubbed the loopome






Categories: Science news

Today on New Scientist

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2014-12-11 17:30
All the latest on newscientist.com: how to think about everything, Lima climate summit, weird comet water, why US police are so violent and more






Categories: Science news
Syndicate content