Science news

Zoologger: The clumsy tree-dweller transforms into a gliding ace

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2015-05-15 17:58
Enormous skin flaps turn flying lemurs into aerial masters capable of manoeuvring through the forest with pinpoint accuracy







Categories: Science news

Hundreds of heritage sites turn nocturnal for Museums at Night festival

Guardian Science - Fri, 2015-05-15 17:51

Public invited to experience museums and galleries across UK late at night as festival aims to celebrate diverse and quirky cultural landscape

Continue reading...







Categories: Science news

Bacteria on shoes could help forensic teams catch suspects

Guardian Science - Fri, 2015-05-15 16:28

Criminals beware: a new study has shown that germs on phones, shoes and other personal belongings can help trace a person’s whereabouts

This piece was first published on The Conversation

Prospective criminals should take note: bacteria are everywhere. A small pilot study has shown that the germs on personal belongings such as shoes and mobile phones are actually a useful way of tracing a person’s whereabouts – something that may prove useful in forensic investigations.

Continue reading...







Categories: Science news

The internet is running out of room – but we can save it

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2015-05-15 16:00
With more of us online, thirsty for media and information, we're nearing the maximum capacity of optical fibres, meaning the internet must adapt to survive







Categories: Science news

Our daily pills: What everyday drugs are really doing to you

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2015-05-15 15:15
Statins, aspirin, HRT… we used to take pills to make us better, but now we guzzle them to keep us well. What are the risks and rewards of preventive medicines?







Categories: Science news

150 years of mathematics in the UK – in pictures

Guardian Science - Fri, 2015-05-15 14:48

As the London Mathematical Society celebrates its 150th anniversary, we look back at some of the key moments and players that helped shape and influence mathematics, including Mary Cartwright, the first female mathematician who founded the chaos theory, and twice president GH Hardy who aptly named his cricket team ‘Hardy’s Mathematicals’

Continue reading...







Categories: Science news

Facebook and the rise of social algorithms - podcast

Guardian Science - Fri, 2015-05-15 13:58
How the filter bubble is shaping our lives Continue reading...







Categories: Science news

Sex education for teenagers should include fertility, says doctor

Guardian Science - Fri, 2015-05-15 13:51

Reproduction specialist Dr Geeta Nargund wants secondary school pupils to be taught about conception, not just contraception

Continue reading...







Categories: Science news

Beware Eurosceptic versions of history and science

Guardian Science - Fri, 2015-05-15 13:28

Historians for Britain hope to shape the debate over Europe. We should question their narrative and our own assumptions about Britain’s place in history and the history of science

Readers of the Guardian Science pages may not have noticed the group called Historians for Britain, or a recent piece in History Today by David Abulafia asserting their belief “that Britain’s unique history sets it apart from the rest of Europe”. Since it is a pressure group, connected to Business for Britain, that aims to use history to steer the debate over the EU referendum, it will probably become increasingly vocal. It requires critical scrutiny from everyone with an interest in Britain’s relationship with the rest of the world, and in evidence-based political discussion.

Abilafia’s article is a classic example of an old-fashioned “Whiggish” narrative. It claims a uniquely moderate and progressive advance toward the development of British institutions, traced continuously from Magna Carta and isolated from the rages and radicalism of the Continent. There has been a strongly negative response from historians on Twitter, sometimes suggesting their opposition as #HistoriansforEurope or, given the scathing reception of Abulafia’s ‘island nation’ narrative, simply #HistoriansforHistory. A reply is being drafted for the pages of History Today and a piece by Neil Gregor has already appeared in The Huffington Post.

Continue reading...







Categories: Science news

Heir to UK throne should keep out of controversial health debate

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2015-05-15 12:06
Pleas in support of complementary medicine by Prince Charles to government ministers have finally been made public. About time, says Edzard Ernst







Categories: Science news

Feedback: A song for a satellite gone

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2015-05-15 12:00
New dimensions in burglary, more numerology of cosmology, the naming of small things and more (full text available to subscribers)







Categories: Science news

Discovered. A fish with a warm heart

Guardian Science - Fri, 2015-05-15 11:42

New research demonstrates a remarkable adaptation in a fish. It has a warm heart

Continue reading...







Categories: Science news

Fighting bugs with bugs: this time it’s personal

Guardian Science - Fri, 2015-05-15 11:23

A possible solution to one of the world’s most pressing problems might be lurking in my own back garden: my son and I see what we can do about it

Continue reading...







Categories: Science news

Warm-blooded opah fish flaps its fins – video

Guardian Science - Fri, 2015-05-15 10:44
Footage from Science magazine, released on Thursday, shows the first warm-blooded fish to be discovered. The opah, found off the US, Australia and other countries, swims using its pectoral muscles to generate warmth. The fish's internal system has been compared to a car-radiator system, similar to endothermic mammals and birds that can maintain their body temperature, regardless of their environment Continue reading...







Categories: Science news

Amanda Knox legal fight highlights fallibility of DNA forensics

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2015-05-15 10:00
In the wake of the Amanda Knox case, Greg Hampikian, DNA expert for the defence, says greater scrutiny of crime labs is needed to avoid further injustice







Categories: Science news

Giant squid found on New Zealand coast – video report

Guardian Science - Fri, 2015-05-15 09:58
Pictures released by Kaikoura Marine Centre and Aquarium shows a dead giant squid, found on Tuesday. The squid was nearly two metres long, with one tentacle reaching an additional five metres. it was found by a man walking his dog at South Bay in Kaikoura. The local marine centre has since moved the squid to a freezer with glass windows so it can be viewed by the public. The aquarium says some samples will go to Auckland and Otago Universities for research Continue reading...







Categories: Science news

How conservatives lost the plot over the rejection of Bjorn Lomborg

Guardian Science - Fri, 2015-05-15 08:21

Danish climate contrarian Bjorn Lomborg was rejected by the University of Western Australia. Was this really Australia’s own “Scopes Monkey Trial”?

Continue reading...







Categories: Science news

Robot cleaner can empty bins and sweep floors

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2015-05-15 07:00
Dussmann, one of the Germany's largest cleaning companies, has been testing an office cleaning robot in its Berlin headquarters







Categories: Science news

Early men and women were equal, say scientists

Guardian Science - Thu, 2015-05-14 22:58

Study shows that modern hunter-gatherer tribes operate on egalitarian basis, suggesting inequality was an aberration that came with the advent of agriculture

Our prehistoric forebears are often portrayed as spear-wielding savages, but the earliest human societies are likely to have been founded on enlightened egalitarian principles, according to scientists.

A study has shown that in contemporary hunter-gatherer tribes, men and women tend to have equal influence on where their group lives and who they live with. The findings challenge the idea that sexual equality is a recent invention, suggesting that it has been the norm for humans for most of our evolutionary history.

Related: How hunting with wolves helped humans outsmart the Neanderthals

Sexual equality is one of the important changes that distinguishes humans. It hasn’t really been highlighted before

Continue reading...







Categories: Science news

Bad memories drive lab rats to rescue drenched companions faster

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2015-05-14 21:00
Empathy motivates rats to free each other from an upsetting wet cage, and they do it more quickly if they have experienced the unpleasant situation themselves







Categories: Science news
Syndicate content