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Birds build snow tunnels for fun

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2014-12-19 18:06
Groups of common redpolls seem to be having fun while burrowing in the snow, but the behaviour may also help them survive in the Arctic






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Today on New Scientist

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2014-12-19 17:30
All the latest on newscientist.com: alien contact, weird sea ghost, Euro-GM rules, Antarctic tourism and more






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Antarctic tourism may pose disease threat to penguins

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2014-12-19 16:17
The Antarctic's blossoming tourist industry and warming climate could be placing penguins at greater risk of infectious diseases






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Acid bath stem-cell scientist can't reproduce results

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2014-12-19 15:34
Haruko Obokata, at the Riken Institute in Kobe, Japan, admitted she could not reproduce evidence of the existence of STAP cells after an eight month investigation






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Nasa satellite captures Earth's Christmas lights – video

Guardian Science - Fri, 2014-12-19 15:29
The Nasa satellite Suomi NPP captures Earth's holiday season lights from space. Nasa used the satellite to compare light emissions from major cities at various points during the year. The scientists found that cities are significantly brighter during major holidays such as Christmas, new year and Ramadan Continue reading...
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Snailfish sets depth record at more than 8,000 metres below surface of Pacific

Guardian Science - Fri, 2014-12-19 14:13

Scientists capture footage of world’s deepest-dwelling fish as well as rare supergiant amphipods in Mariana Trench

Microplastic deposits found deep in world’s oceans and seas

North Pacific hit by massive coral die-off

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Large carnivores and humans can live together

Guardian Science - Fri, 2014-12-19 14:00

Large carnivores are making an extraordinary comeback in Europe, according to the latest research

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World's deepest fish filmed eight kilometres down in the Mariana Trench - video

Guardian Science - Fri, 2014-12-19 13:05
Scientists at the University of Aberdeen have set a new record for the world's deepest fish, filming a type of snailfish at a depth of 8145m in the Mariana trench in the western Pacific Ocean. The team completed an unprecedented 92 deployments across the entire trench, from depths of 5000-10,600 metres, filming species of fish. The species of snailfish discovered at the record depth had never been seen before Continue reading...






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Unbroken: what makes some people more resilient than others?

Guardian Science - Fri, 2014-12-19 12:54

The resilience of people like Louis Zamperini in the face of extraordinary trauma, as depicted in the film Unbroken, has lessons for psychiatrists treating post-traumatic stress disorder

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Europe set to allow individual nations to ban GM crops

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2014-12-19 12:30
Proposed new rules would let member states of the European Union ban genetically modified crops on their soil even if the EU has approved the crops






Categories: Science news

Feedback: A gramophone news service

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2014-12-19 12:00
Prefiguration in Budapest, call us on the Telephonoscope, the round globe is a vast head and more (full text available to subscribers)






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Europa's geysers disappear in a cloud of mystery

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2014-12-19 11:34
Plumes of water from Jupiter's moon Europa have not reappeared since their discovery – and evidence now suggests they may not have existed to begin with






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Zoology Notes 001: vampire bats can run

Guardian Science - Fri, 2014-12-19 10:57

Vampire bats can run, with a top speed of more than 2 metres per second

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Against Excellence

Guardian Science - Fri, 2014-12-19 10:38

Universities are currently agonising about the Research Excellence Framework. Jack Stilgoe doesn’t have a problem with research assessment. He thinks that the real trouble lies with the word ‘excellence’.

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10 diktats from Brussels that are ruining life in Britain

Guardian Science - Fri, 2014-12-19 10:02

From lowering energy bills to stopping toxic chemicals poisoning the environment, here are just some of the ways we’re tyrannised by the EU

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Twenty years on from Longitude… rewriting the “villainous” Nevil Maskelyne

Guardian Science - Fri, 2014-12-19 08:15

A new book on a Georgian Astronomer Royal reveals that there was a great deal more to Nevil Maskelyne than being clockmaker John Harrison’s bête noire

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Did 2014 mark the beginning of the end for mental health stigma?

Guardian Science - Fri, 2014-12-19 07:15

A lot of dreadful things happened in 2014. But one potential positive trend is that it seemed increasingly difficult to get away with dismissing or condemning those with mental health problems. Is this an anomaly, or is the tide really turning against mental health stigma?
The Guardian and Observer Christmas appeal on mental health
Click here to donate to the Guardian and Observer Christmas charity appeal

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Weird sea ghost breaks record for deepest living fish

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2014-12-19 03:00
A newly discovered species with a bizarre body has been spotted deeper down than any other living fish






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How to think about… Alien contact

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2014-12-18 20:00
First, try not to think about what alien life might be like. Then wonder whether we have any chance of finding it (full text available to subscribers)






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2014 science breakthroughs: no more ageing, cave art and landing on a comet

Guardian Science - Thu, 2014-12-18 19:28
Accolade for Philae probe and its mothership, Rosetta, but top spot in journal Science’s list goes to genetic researchers

All three of its landing systems failed on impact and its detectors and transmitters stopped operating after only 57 hours. Yet the Philae probe that moored itself to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko last month, together with its mothership Rosetta, were yesterday hailed as one of the journal Science’s Breakthroughs of 2014.

The European Space Agency mission makes comet 67P the seventh place in the solar system (apart from Earth) on which a spaceship has landed, the journal says. Venus, Mars, the Moon, Saturn’s moon Titan, and two asteroids complete the list. But Rosetta’s success was the most complex in terms of manoeuvring round the solar system, a 10-year journey that left the craft in slow pursuit of comet 67P as it headed towards the Sun earlier this year. After mapping the surface of the duck-shaped comet Rosetta released its little lander on 12 November. However, the harpoons, screws and reverse thrusters that were supposed to moor it to its target all failed and the craft bounced helplessly across the comet’s surface before settling down in the shadow of a cliff. Without sunlight to recharge its batteries, Philae ran out of power 57 hours later.

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