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The Guardian view on Britain’s choice 2015: science policy

Guardian Science - Sun, 2015-04-26 19:28
It is not enough to make vaguely encouraging noises: all the parties need a deeper commitment to the value, and values, of science Continue reading...
Categories: Science news

Trial of radioactive implants offers improved prostate cancer survival

Guardian Science - Sun, 2015-04-26 19:02

Treatment using permanently implanted radioactive ‘seeds’ doubles rates of five-year tumour-free survival compared with conventional high-dose radiotherapy

A prostate cancer treatment using permanently implanted radioactive “seeds” doubles rates of five-year tumour-free survival compared with conventional high-dose radiotherapy, a study has found.

Low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB) involves the insertion of tiny radioactive implants into the prostate gland.

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Categories: Science news

Fears for olive crop force Brussels to tackle spread of leaf scorch

Guardian Science - Sun, 2015-04-26 13:59

Xylella fastidiosa, a bacterium that kills a wide range of fruiting trees and has wiped out Italian plantations, has been identified in Paris

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Categories: Science news

Could we 'de-extinctify' the woolly mammoth?

Guardian Science - Sun, 2015-04-26 11:38

A team from Harvard made headlines by announcing it had put mammoth DNA into elephant cells. But should we ‘de-extinctify’ the beasts and return them to their old stamping grounds?

Extinction, it seems, may no longer be for ever. Several weeks ago, scientists in George Church’s lab at Harvard University announced that they had created living elephant cells that contained a small component of synthesised mammoth DNA. The announcement stirred both excitement and concern that the mammoth – a hairier cousin of the Asian elephant – might soon be back from the dead. But how close are we really to seeing resurrected mammoths wandering their old stamping grounds, including the Norfolk countryside? The answer depends on how you define mammoth.

Let’s begin by laying out what resources we have today. First, scientists who study the genetics of extinct species have recently decoded most of the mammoth’s genome sequence, which means we have a pretty good genetic blueprint for making a mammoth. Second, by comparing the mammoth genome sequence to the elephant’s, we are beginning to understand how, at the level of their DNA, mammoths and Asian elephants differed. This tells us what parts of the elephant genome we will need to change in order to make a mammoth. Third, recent advances in genome engineering technologies provide a powerful toolkit for editing genomes, including cutting out and replacing specific genes. And fourth, the work at Harvard has proved that these tools can be used to insert mammoth DNA into an elephant cell. Resurrected mammoths no longer seem the stuff of fantasy.

Related: Hopes raised for new genetic therapy to prevent inherited diseases

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Categories: Science news

It's time to let national happiness guide political policy

New Scientist - news - Sun, 2015-04-26 10:00
The real feel-good factors must be allowed to guide government decisions alongside economic measures, says economist and Labour peer Richard Layard







Categories: Science news

Why was the earthquake in Nepal such a devastating event?

Guardian Science - Sun, 2015-04-26 09:56

At 7.8 on the Richter scale, this was a powerful quake – and its source was only 11km below ground

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Categories: Science news

Painkillers and antacids may be removed from subsidised medicines list

Guardian Science - Sun, 2015-04-26 03:33

Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme review told stripping out paracetamol, aspirin and antacids would save budget millions

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Categories: Science news

Getting to grips with the placenta's real health benefits

New Scientist - news - Sat, 2015-04-25 16:00
A project to understand the body's most mysterious organ could help us tackle everything from pregnancy complications to heart disease, says Cathy Spong







Categories: Science news

Touching down on Mars could still be a far-off prospect

New Scientist - news - Sat, 2015-04-25 13:00
Landing on the Red Planet may remain a distant dream for now, despite ambitious plans by aerospace companies to take people there in the next decade







Categories: Science news

Hopes of vaccine for Parkinson’s sufferers

Guardian Science - Sat, 2015-04-25 12:56
Research hints that disease is caused by toxins, whose spread to the brain could be blocked Continue reading...







Categories: Science news

Australia 'public enemy number one' of UN climate talks, says Nobel laureate

Guardian Science - Fri, 2015-04-24 23:41

Peter Doherty, Nobel laureate of medicine, says a clear message has emerged at an international symposium of experts in climate, economics and business

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Categories: Science news

La apuesta a viralizar la opinión - Revista Ñ

Marcus du Sautoy news - Fri, 2015-04-24 22:31

Revista Ñ

La apuesta a viralizar la opinión
Revista Ñ
Ya en el año 2010, el matemático británico Marcus du Sautoy publicó en The Guardian “ Liked the book? Try the app ”, una elegía a las apps literarias luego de haber probado las versiones para iPad de dos libros: la novela histórica de Hilary Mantel ...

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Categories: Marcus du Sautoy

Liquid mercury found under Mexican pyramid could lead to king's tomb

Guardian Science - Fri, 2015-04-24 22:23

Researcher reports ‘large quantities’ of the substance under ruins of Teotihuacan in discovery that could shed light on city’s mysterious leaders

An archaeologist has discovered liquid mercury at the end of a tunnel beneath a Mexican pyramid, a finding that could suggest the existence of a king’s tomb or a ritual chamber far below one of the most ancient cities of the Americas.

Mexican researcher Sergio Gómez announced on Friday that he had discovered “large quantities” of liquid mercury in a chamber below the Pyramid of the Feathered Serpent, the third largest pyramid of Teotihuacan, the ruined city in central Mexico.

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Categories: Science news

Conservative thinktank seeks to change Pope Francis's mind on climate change

Guardian Science - Fri, 2015-04-24 20:43

Heartland Institute wants to lobby Vatican before pope delivers a moral call to climate action this summer

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Categories: Science news

The Vital Question: Finding answers about the origin of life

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2015-04-24 20:00
Life was shaped by the very thing that fuelled it, linking questions about everything from our lifespan to the nature of alien life, argues a book by Nick Lane







Categories: Science news

Tax cuts for top earners fail because the theory is broken

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2015-04-24 19:00
Tax breaks for the wealthy were meant to trickle through society to benefit all. It didn't work and inequality just got worse, says economist Ha-Joon Chang







Categories: Science news

Tiny robots climb walls carrying more than 100 times their weight

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2015-04-24 18:30
The two robots borrow techniques from both inchworms and geckos to climb up walls while carrying huge loads







Categories: Science news

Attempt to ban toxic 'diet drug' DNP fails

Guardian Science - Fri, 2015-04-24 18:28

News comes just days after ‘slimming pill’ kills Eloise Parry, who had been seeking medical help to stop taking drug

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Categories: Science news

The Homer Simpson effect: forgetting to remember

Guardian Science - Fri, 2015-04-24 18:00

New research suggests that the act of remembering causes forgetting of similar but irrelevant memories.

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Categories: Science news
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