Feed aggregator

Create UN military unit to protect ancient sites from Isis, says Italy

Guardian Science - Thu, 2015-03-19 19:03

World’s archaeological heritage needs protection by UN ‘blue helmets of culture’ force akin to peacekeepers, says culture minister Dario Franceschini

Continue reading...






Categories: Science news

Cane toad has surprise effect on Australian ecosystem

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2015-03-19 18:57
Invasive toads in Australia poison predators that eat them, allowing other prey, like the crimson finch to flourish






Categories: Science news

Eclipse 2015: Your guide to the solar spectacle

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2015-03-19 17:46
What will happen, where and when, and how to watch tomorrow's eclipse safely - as well as what scientists might learn from it






Categories: Science news

Video games beat interviews to recruit the very best

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2015-03-19 17:30
Forget interviews. Being good at special video games could land you that plum job  – and help make recruitment a fairer process






Categories: Science news

How chemistry affects the evolution of life

Guardian Science - Thu, 2015-03-19 17:18

In this fascinating video, Professor Ros Rickaby from Oxford chats with Professor Simon Conway-Morris at Cambridge about how Earth’s changing chemistry has affected evolution, and how this can sometimes lead to evolutionary convergence

Continue reading...






Categories: Science news

Solar eclipse 2015: what you need to know

Guardian Science - Thu, 2015-03-19 17:05

From science and superstitions to where you can see it and how to stay safe, here is everything you need to enjoy the sun’s upcoming vanishing act

Continue reading...






Categories: Science news

NHS game-changers: The key challenges to healthcare

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2015-03-19 17:03
With the UK general election looming, New Scientist looks beyond the funding crisis to the disruptive forces that the politicians aren’t talking about






Categories: Science news

Mark Zuckerberg book club tackles the philosophy of science

Guardian Science - Thu, 2015-03-19 16:56

Facebook founder’s latest online book club choice is Thomas Kuhn’s classic The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, on the ebb and flow of progress

Continue reading...






Categories: Science news

Solar eclipse and freak weather may mess up renewables

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2015-03-19 15:47
This week's eclipse will test solar power resilience in Germany, but it may be just a taste of challenges ahead as we deploy more renewables






Categories: Science news

Electric cars are so cool they may make it colder

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2015-03-19 15:30
A benefit of replacing conventional cars with electric ones could be a cooling effect in cities of up to 1 °C, which could cut air conditioning use






Categories: Science news

Syrian seedbank wins award for continuing work despite civil war

Guardian Science - Thu, 2015-03-19 15:14

Syrian scientists who risked their lives preserving the region’s ancient farming heritage with nearly 150,000 seed samples are presented Gregor Mendel award in Berlin

Continue reading...






Categories: Science news

IVF nutrients may dictate if the baby's a boy or girl

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2015-03-19 15:00
For people undergoing IVF, the type of protein-rich liquid their embryos develop in could play a role in determining their baby's sex






Categories: Science news

UK prepares for solar eclipse impact on electricity grid

Guardian Science - Thu, 2015-03-19 14:11

Event expected to trigger huge downturn in power demand as people go outside to watch, as well as sudden removal of solar power from electricity supply

Continue reading...






Categories: Science news

NHS game-changers: The antibiotic apocalypse

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2015-03-19 12:00
By 2050, antibiotic-resistant microbes could cost the world $1 trillion a year. We need new drugs and technology that can take the guesswork out of diagnosis






Categories: Science news

My little fetal pony wins top Wellcome photo prize

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2015-03-19 12:00
You're unlikely to have seen a New Forest pony quite like this one captured in an image shortlisted for the Wellcome Image Awards 2015






Categories: Science news

Does walking make you stiff?

Guardian Science - Thu, 2015-03-19 11:57

Improvements in treatment have led to better survival rates following a heart attack. But is the quality of that longer life measuring up?

Continue reading...






Categories: Science news

Do your genes determine your entire life?

Guardian Science - Thu, 2015-03-19 07:00
Some scientists claim that new discoveries have proved free will is an illusion. Nonsense, says Julian Baggini

Whenever you read stories about identical twins separated at birth, they tend to follow the template set by the most remarkable of them all: the “two Jims”. James Springer and James Lewis were separated as one-month-olds, adopted by different families and reunited at age 39. When University of Minnesota psychologist Thomas Bouchard met them in 1979, he found, as a Washington Post article put it, both had “married and divorced a woman named Linda and remarried a Betty. They shared interests in mechanical drawing and carpentry; their favourite school subject had been maths, their least favourite, spelling. They smoked and drank the same amount and got headaches at the same time of day.” The similarities were uncanny. A great deal of who they would turn out to be appears to have been written in their genes.

Other studies at the world-leading Minnesota Center for Twin and Family Research suggest that many of our traits are more than 50% inherited, including obedience to authority, vulnerability to stress, and risk-seeking. Researchers have even suggested that when it comes to issues such as religion and politics, our choices are much more determined by our genes than we think.

To predict whether someone believes in God, it’s more useful to know they live in Texas than what their genes are

Various options are pencilled in by our genes, and our life experiences determine which get inked

A fan of Shostakovich does not, usually at least, wish she could just decide to prefer Andrew Lloyd Webber

Our current knowledge of neurobiology makes it clear that there is no such thing as absolute freedom

Continue reading...






Categories: Science news

Mystery of Darwin's strange South American mammals solved

Guardian Science - Thu, 2015-03-19 05:37

Last unresolved ‘major problem in mammalian evolution’ – the origin of two ungulates – has been resolved according to researchers

To 19th century British naturalist Charles Darwin, they were the strangest animals yet discovered, one looking like a hybrid of a hippo, rhino and rodent and another resembling a humpless camel with an elephant’s trunk.

Ever since Darwin first collected their fossils about 180 years ago, scientists had been baffled about where these odd South American beasts that went extinct just 10,000 years ago fit on the mammal family tree. The mystery has now been solved.

Continue reading...






Categories: Science news

Large cache of giant lemur bones found in flooded cave

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2015-03-19 00:00
Giant lemurs, horned crocodiles, pygmy hippos and gigantic birds discovered in a watery cave grave may have been swept there by floods
Categories: Science news

EU food imports help drive illegal deforestation

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-03-18 23:00
The European Union is revealed as the biggest importer of produce from farmers who have illegally cleared tropical forests for crops and cattle
Categories: Science news
Syndicate content