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Fractals seen in throbs of pulsating golden stars

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-01-28 14:02
Zoom in on a star's vibrations and, if they're related by the golden ratio, you might see fractals, like a coastline. This could tell us about what's going on inside






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Moon milestone prizes awarded to XPrize competitors

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-01-28 13:51
The Google-sponsored competition to land a spacecraft on the moon has awarded "milestone prizes" to five competing teams






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Sperm whale's emergency evacuation... of its bowels

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-01-28 13:16
What does such a gigantic animal have to be scared of? Spooked by the photographers, this sperm whale protected itself by enveloping them in a poonado






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What lightning looks like from space - timelapse video

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-01-28 11:43
The European Space Agency (ESA) has released timelapse footage of lightning striking earth, as seen from the International Space Station. The footage, filmed in 2012, is made up of 49 images taken from 200km above Earth. The ESA's Nightpod camera aid helps the astronaut take remarkably clear photos despite circling the Earth at 28,800 km/h Continue reading...






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Peanut allergy researchers say they may have found key to a cure

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-01-28 04:33

Melbourne-based study of children given nut protein with probiotic has transformed the lives of 80% of those who took part in clinical trial

Australian researchers have found a possible key to a cure for people with potentially fatal peanut allergies.

A Melbourne-based study has already transformed the lives of many of the children who took part in the clinical trial.

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Sugary drinks may cause menstruation to start earlier, study suggests

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-01-28 00:05
Scientists say impact of bringing forward girl’s first period by 2.7 months is likely to be modest

Sugary drinks may be causing girls to start menstruating earlier, research suggests. A study of girls aged nine to 14 found that those averaging more than 1.5 sugar-sweetened beverages a day had their first period 2.7 months earlier than those consuming two a week or fewer.

The difference of a few months is not great, but the researchers say it may be significant because earlier onset menstrual periods are among the factors contributing to an increased risk of breast cancer later in life. However, one expert said the small change may not be hugely biologically relevant.

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Winchester hit by earthquake of 2.9 magnitude

Guardian Science - Tue, 2015-01-27 21:14
Residents in Kingsworthy area felt something ‘like an explosion which shook their houses’, Hampshire police report Continue reading...






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E. O. Wilson: Religious faith is dragging us down

New Scientist - news - Tue, 2015-01-27 20:00
The extinctions we cause will kill us too, says the sociobiology pioneer – the best thing would be to eliminate religions, though not human spiritual yearning (full text available to subscribers)






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Turbulent lessons from tropical storms

New Scientist - news - Tue, 2015-01-27 19:00
From 16th-century colonisers of the Caribbean to Katrina's victims, Stuart Schwarz's Sea of Storms explores the long geopolitical shadow of tropical hurricanes






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Today on New Scientist

New Scientist - news - Tue, 2015-01-27 17:30
All the latest on newscientist.com: normal foot myth, eco-utopias vs eco-activism, planets almost as old as the universe and more






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Gene linked to long life also protects against mental decline in old age

Guardian Science - Tue, 2015-01-27 17:00

Discovery gives scientists hope of developing a therapy that could slowdown the progression of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia

People who carry a mutated gene linked to longer lifespan have extra tissue in part of the brain that seems to protect them against mental decline in old age.

The finding has shed light on a biological pathway that researchers now hope to turn into a therapy that slows the progression of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

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Scientists have found a way to ‘unboil’ eggs – and it could be a life-saver

Guardian Science - Tue, 2015-01-27 16:37
It may not sound like the most useful of scientific endeavours, but the methods used to turn a hard-boiled egg back into its liquid state could bring major benefits to areas as diverse as cheese-making and cancer research

It sounds like the breakthrough that no one was asking for: scientists have announced they have managed to “unboil” an egg. In a disgusting-sounding experiment that you probably shouldn’t try at home, an international team of researchers have used urea, one of the main components of urine, and a “vortex fluid device” to uncook a hen’s egg. They believe the findings could dramatically reduce costs in processes as far apart as cheese manufacturing and cancer research.

The researchers boiled an egg for 20 minutes, before focusing on returning one protein in the egg white to its previous state. The idea was to combat the difficulties that arise when proteins “misfold”, forcing scientists to use time-consuming methods to untangle misfolded proteins or expensive methods to ensure the proteins don’t get tangled up in the first place.

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Fed up of your double chin? There could soon be an injection for it

Guardian Science - Tue, 2015-01-27 15:58
It’s one of the curses of growing older, but now a US company hopes its new compound could be just the thing for those sick of sagging fat Continue reading...






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Self-help healthcare fuelled shock Greek election win

New Scientist - news - Tue, 2015-01-27 15:03
Volunteer-run services are plugging holes left by cutbacks in Greece and may have helped focus support for the radical Syriza party






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Is it time to stop using the word 'terrorist'?

Guardian Science - Tue, 2015-01-27 14:51

A BBC executive has damned the label as ‘loaded’. Where does the word come from, and can it ever be more than a value judgment?

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Do common drugs really cause dementia?

Guardian Science - Tue, 2015-01-27 14:41

Media reports of a recent study suggesting a wide variety of common drugs can increase the chances of getting dementia are more sensationalism than science

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Ancient planetary system with its own sun-like star found in the galaxy

Guardian Science - Tue, 2015-01-27 14:06

Discovery of five planets orbiting around Kepler 444 suggests ancient worlds might lurk around other stars in more habitable reaches of the Milky Way

The discovery of five archaic planets around one of the oldest stars in the galaxy has raised the possibility that the Milky Way might be home to extremely ancient forms of life.

Astronomers spotted the planets as they circled a star called Kepler 444, which lies 117 light years from Earth in the direction of Lyra, a constellation in the northern sky.

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Global warming spells disaster for tropical Andes glaciers

Guardian Science - Tue, 2015-01-27 13:13

Glacier monitoring technology shows the most rapid glacier depletion for at least three centuries. Big glaciers are shrinking, with small ones disappearing altogether, writes Bernard Francou

As components of the global cryosphere, mountain glaciers are known for their high sensitivity to climate change. Glaciers are the result of solid precipitation and reflect its variability from one year to the next. The ablation process – by which glaciers lose snow and ice, converting it into water and vapor – depends directly on the energy balance at the surface. Therefore, the processes of accumulation and ablation are the physical link between glaciers and climate, which explains why these ice bodies are such valuable tracers of climate variability on the scale of decades and centuries.

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Keeping an open mind about consciousness research

New Scientist - news - Tue, 2015-01-27 11:00
Open Mind is an eclectic open-access website about cutting-edge consciousness and cognitive research






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Laser flight path caught on camera for the first time

New Scientist - news - Tue, 2015-01-27 10:00
It's usually only possible to see the spot where a laser lands rather than its path, but now an ultrafast camera has caught those photons mid-flight






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