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Submerge a wine glass in water to make an ‘inverted glass harp’

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-08-26 18:00
The physics of musical wine glasses gets an update, as a wine glass inside water turns out to be just as tuneful as the reverse









Categories: Science news

Ant knows how to self-medicate to fight off fungal infection

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-08-26 18:00
When their bodies are under attack by a fungus, one species of ant chooses food laced with hydrogen peroxide and is more likely to live as a result









Categories: Science news

Bed-wetting dries up after magnetic stimulation of lower back

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-08-26 18:00
Stimulating the brain magnetically seems to help with some symptoms of depression, stroke and schizophrenia. Now it has been applied to the back to help with bladder control









Categories: Science news

Zoologger: Daring raptors lock talons mid-air and cartwheel down

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-08-26 18:00
We thought it was part of courtship: birds of prey get entangled, then spiral downwards and may even crash. But it seems it's often anything but romantic









Categories: Science news

Genetic switch makes fat cells burn energy rather than store it

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-08-26 18:00
We now know how to turn fat cells into ones that burn calories as heat rather than store them – raising the prospect of a gene therapy for obesity









Categories: Science news

Glaciers seed ocean with silicon – and fuel plankton growth

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-08-26 18:00
Glacier melt may be providing significant amounts of silicon to plankton, boosting their population and the amount of carbon dioxide they can soak up









Categories: Science news

Aspirin may restore pregnancy sex ratio skewed by inflammation

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-08-26 16:49
Women who have miscarried appear less likely to give birth to boys, and inflammation skews the sex ratio further. Low doses of aspirin could restore it









Categories: Science news

Submerge a wine glass in water to make ‘inverted harp of glass’

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-08-26 15:32
The physics of musical wine glasses gets an update with a glass inside water, instead of water inside a glass









Categories: Science news

Why Rick Guidotti turned his back on Cindy Crawford to challenge our perceptions of genetic diseases

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-08-26 13:31

Previously in the business of snapping supermodels, a chance meeting at a bus stop made this fashion photographer look again at young people affected visibly by genetic disease.

See a gallery of Guidotti’s Positive Exposure pictures.

I’m in a hotel in Seattle watching photographer Rick Guidotti at work. Amid high fives and shouts of “awesome” a group of young people are laughing and posing as he clicks away, capturing the wide smiles and infectious enthusiasm in the room. This is not an average photo shoot, however, and Rick is not your average photographer. Each of the young people has Costello Syndrome, a rare genetic syndrome, characterised by very distinct physical features, varying degrees of learning disability and an increased risk of cancer.

A few years ago, Guidotti was a successful fashion photographer, flying between New York, Paris and Milan working on high-profile campaigns for YSL, Revlon, Elle, Vogue and Marie Claire, photographing some of the most beautiful women in the world.

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Categories: Science news

Sun sets on era of the Humvee as US military announces successor

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-08-26 13:09

Symbol of decades of US interventions to be replaced with vehicle more suited to urban warfare environment the US has faced in Iraq and Afghanistan

It became the symbol of half a dozen US military interventions – a vehicle instantly recognisable across the globe, and as popular with the US military (if not with the actual soldiers) as with Islamic State, who stole 2,300 of them in Iraq during the fall of Mosul in 2014.

Now the US Department of Defense has announced the beginning of the end for the ubiquitous Humvee, awarding a $6.7bn contract to replace it to the Wisconsin firm Oshkosh.

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Categories: Science news

Diagnosis without doctors: Deep learning to transform medicine

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-08-26 12:20
Software that can analyse medical data and diagnose conditions is coming. Could it do better than a doctor?









Categories: Science news

How do you go about embracing complexity? It's complicated

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-08-26 11:44

Surprisingly enough complexity turns out to be complicated to handle - but here two physicists offer a set of principles for where to start

Jean Boulton is a onetime theoretical physicist turned consultant, and one of her passions is complexity and systems thinking, and their implications for how organisations, including development agencies, go about their work.

She’s teamed up with fellow lapsed physicist Peter Allen, and Cliff Bowman (a “theorist and practitioner of strategy,” whatever that is) to write Embracing Complexity: Strategic Perspectives for an Age of Turbulence, a smart, 250-page introduction to complexity and its implications for action.

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Categories: Science news

Mud sweat and tears - taking science to Green Man festival

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-08-26 10:16

Despite our marquee not surviving the Welsh rain, science is a strong part of Green Man’s identity, and what makes it special

This weekend I took part in one of the more unusual science-communication events I’ve ever done. I, along with other researchers in my lab group, risked both sunburn and trench foot to bring a science stall to Green Man.

Despite being predominantly a music festival, Green Man takes its science seriously. There is a whole area called Einstein’s Garden, with science stalls run by academics, and a programmed stage and tent operating throughout the whole festival. Science-themed activities include singing, stand up comedy, plays, interactive shows for kids, demos, skeletons, even 4-hour taxidermy workshops!

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Categories: Science news

China crash a sign of nation’s transition to a new economy

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-08-26 10:00
Financial events this week reflect what made the nation's tough emissions targets possible – a shift from heavy industry towards a more advanced economy









Categories: Science news

Revealed: how to pick the perfect Poohstick

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-08-26 08:52

Scientists say there is a formula for winning the stick-throwing bridge game made famous by Winnie the Pooh and friends

Poohsticks, the timeless game made famous by Winnie the Pooh, Piglet and Christopher Robin, is not a game of chance, according to scientists – and there’s even a formula to win.

The game, in which competitors drop sticks into a river upstream off a bridge and see which comes out downstream first, is first mentioned in the book The House At Pooh Corner by AA Milne published in 1928.

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Categories: Science news

Stephen Hawking: 'If you feel you are in a black hole, don’t give up. There’s a way out.'

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-08-26 07:56

Physicist says information sucked into a black hole may emerge in another universe

All is not lost if you fall into a black hole – you could simply pop up in another universe, according to Stephen Hawking.

The celebrated physicist has a new theory about where lost information ends up after being sucked into a black hole, a place where gravity compresses matter to a point where the usual laws of physics break down.

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Categories: Science news

When will my life begin? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Linda Blair

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-08-26 07:00
Every day, millions of internet users ask Google life’s most difficult questions, big and small. Our writers answer some of the commonest queries

The answer to this question may surprise you. Your life will begin when two important changes take place. Fortunately, these changes are totally within your control. They are attitudes, not circumstances, and both have been chosen by you rather than imposed upon you, although you may not be aware of having made those choices.

The first impediment to living fully right now is the belief that you need to consider all possible options before you commit to anything. We believe in choice – when asked, most people will tell you that it’s better to have lots of choices. That way, most people will say, you’ll make a better decision, and feel happier and more satisfied as a result.

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Categories: Science news

Dainty step gives mosquito legs strength to walk on water

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-08-26 07:00
A mosquito can bear up to 23 times its total body weight on each leg, which is crucial for landing on water – the insect's secret is way it stands









Categories: Science news

Two of Australia’s three wombat species under threat from killer ​disease

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-08-26 04:44

Sarcoptic mange can leave southern hairy-nosed and bare-nosed wombats blind and deaf before eventually killing them

Two of Australia’s three native wombat species are under threat from a disease which can leave the animal blind and deaf, and eventually kill them.

A project launched by the University of Western Sydney is calling on the wider community to help track wombat health, and hopefully stop the spread of the sarcoptic mange disease before it wipes out the animals.

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Categories: Science news

House dust can reveal who you live with and what your pet is, study shows

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-08-26 00:01

Dust from 1100 homes was surveyed to learn more about microbes that might exacerbate breathing problems and allergies ... or even have health benefits

If the steady build-up of grime, stains and crumbs on the floor is not enough to spur you to a home cleaning spree, then research on the bugs that lurk in house dust might just do the job.

Tests on dust gathered from the tops of door frames in more than 1100 US homes revealed rich communities of fungi and bacteria that varied with the sexes of the home’s occupants, and whether cats or dogs lived with them.

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Categories: Science news
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