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Why we're only 'somewhat proud' to be British

Guardian Science - Mon, 2014-04-14 17:49
Forty-seven per cent of Britons are 'somewhat' proud of their country. The word is a splendid tool of British understatement and perfectly in keeping with the national character Continue reading...






Categories: Science news

Submarine drone dives into hunt for missing MH370 jet

New Scientist - news - Mon, 2014-04-14 17:45
An autonomous underwater vehicle is being dispatched on a series of 24-hour-long missions to look for the lost Malaysia Airlines flight






Categories: Science news

SpaceX poised for space station cargo run Monday after several delays

Guardian Science - Mon, 2014-04-14 16:54
  • Launch has been delayed several times for technical issues
  • Monday's flight is third of 12 under firm's $1.6bn Nasa contract
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Categories: Science news

German energy crisis points towards climate solution

New Scientist - news - Mon, 2014-04-14 16:50
Europe's powerhouse is leading the fight against climate change, but its push for renewables has left it burning ever more coal






Categories: Science news

No option left but to suck CO2 out of air, says IPCC

New Scientist - news - Mon, 2014-04-14 16:47
It's too late to avoid dangerous climate change just by switching to renewable energy, so we will also have to pull the greenhouse gas out of the atmosphere






Categories: Science news

'Big Bird' space neutrino has highest energy yet seen

New Scientist - news - Mon, 2014-04-14 16:30
A playfully named subatomic particle is confirmed, and beats rivals Bert and Ernie in terms of energy. Next step: to find a cluster of space neutrinos






Categories: Science news

Dante's wildfire inferno in Chile's historic port city

New Scientist - news - Mon, 2014-04-14 15:43
Valparaíso's natural amphitheatre of wooded hills has become a cauldron of smoke and flame after a forest fire took root in the coastal city






Categories: Science news

Einstein's waves would make a cosmic overture

New Scientist - news - Mon, 2014-04-14 09:00
We haven't heard a single gravitational wave in the century since Einstein said they should exist. Hopefully, that's about to change






Categories: Science news

We're offering $2m for the best ocean acidity mapping

New Scientist - news - Mon, 2014-04-14 08:00
To keep the seas healthy, we need to measure how they are changing. It's no simple task, but here's an incentive, says oceans X Prize director Paul Bunje






Categories: Science news

Science Weekly podcast: James Lovelock on the future of planet Earth

Guardian Science - Mon, 2014-04-14 06:00
James Lovelock takes Guardian science correspondent Ian Sample on a tour of a new exhibition at London's Science Museum, documenting his inventions and theories, and delivers a grim prognosis for Gaia's future Continue reading...






Categories: Science news

Einstein's silence: Listening for space-time ripples

New Scientist - news - Sun, 2014-04-13 20:00
To hear gravitational waves – faint murmurs in the fabric of space-time – requires a place quieter than quietness itself. Anil Ananthaswamy pays a visit (full text available to subscribers)






Categories: Science news

Nasa supplies to launch despite critical outage at International Space Station

Guardian Science - Sun, 2014-04-13 19:37

Private company SpaceX will deliver critical food and parts
Astronauts plan emergency spacewalk to make repairs

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Categories: Science news

Are RNA fragments making gene tweaks in descendants?

New Scientist - news - Sun, 2014-04-13 18:00
Strands of genetic material known as microRNAs could explain how what happens in your life can cause genetic changes and diseases in subsequent generations






Categories: Science news

Archaeologists' findings may prove Rome a century older than thought

Guardian Science - Sun, 2014-04-13 17:38
As Italian capital approaches 2,767th birthday, excavation reveals wall built long before official founding year of 753BC

It is already known as the eternal city, and if new archaeological findings prove correct Rome may turn out to be even more ancient than believed until now.

Next week, the city will celebrate its official, 2,767th birthday. According to a tradition going back to classic times, the brothers Romulus and Remus founded the city on 21 April in the year 753BC.

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Categories: Science news

Quarks bonding differently at LHCb

Guardian Science - Sun, 2014-04-13 16:10

The strong force binds quarks together to form hadrons. Until last Monday, only two types of hadron were known, but the LHCb experiment at CERN has just proved there is a third way

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Categories: Science news

Why odd numbers are dodgy, evens are good, and 7 is everyone's favourite

Guardian Science - Sun, 2014-04-13 00:06
What's your lucky number? An online survey threw up a hot favourite: people find 7 clever, cheery, divine. And our reactions to numbers shine a fascinating light on how our brains work, especially in the oh-so-superstitious far east Continue reading...






Categories: Science news

New to nature No 121: Cavichiana bromelicola

Guardian Science - Sun, 2014-04-13 00:05
A brilliantly coloured new species of leafhopper is the first to be associated with bromeliads in their native habitat Continue reading...






Categories: Science news

Whose fault is your lager hangover? Blame it on migrating birds

Guardian Science - Sun, 2014-04-13 00:05
Researchers say the hybrid yeast that makes the world's favourite beer was probably created when a tree-dwelling Patagonian strain crossed the Atlantic with migrating birds

Lager drinkers can thank the birds for their favourite tipple. That is the conclusion of US scientists who say the yeast involved in making their beloved amber nectar could have been spread round the planet by migrating birds.

The work, by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, follows up on the 2011 discovery that a key component of the yeast used to make cold-brewed beers came from Patagonia, in South America.

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Categories: Science news

Particle Fever: the film that brings the Higgs boson to life

Guardian Science - Sun, 2014-04-13 00:05
Particle Fever is a gripping insider account of the world's biggest, most expensive scientific experiment. But it's also a real-life drama about understanding the universe, says director Mark Levinson Continue reading...






Categories: Science news
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