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The greatest physics theorem you've never heard of

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-04-22 20:00
This concept's played a greater part in physics than relativity and quantum theory, so why has the great woman behind it not achieved Einstein's fame? (full text available to subscribers)







Categories: Science news

Stegosaurus back plates differed between sexes, new study reveals

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-04-22 19:00

Finding is most convincing evidence so far that male and female dinosaurs looked different and may have had mating selection rituals comparable to birds

The male Stegosaurus had billboard-like back plates that it used to attract potential mates, while females had prickly spikes that kept predators at bay, scientists have discovered.

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Categories: Science news

These neon-lit cells reveal new ways of preventing blindness

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-04-22 19:00
Targeting a protein that causes rampant growth of cells in retinal blood vessels could lead to new treatments for vision loss in older people







Categories: Science news

Injectable lab finds your best cancer drug by trying many at once

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-04-22 19:00
The torturous trial-and-error process of finding the best cancer drug for an individual could be a thing of the past thanks to a couple of clever devices







Categories: Science news

California moves closer to tightening child vaccination laws

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-04-22 18:30
State education committee passes a bill banning parents exempting kids from vaccination because of "personal beliefs", as lawmakers around the world discuss similar measures







Categories: Science news

Bees may become addicted to nicotine-like pesticides, study finds

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-04-22 18:00

Bees have a preference for sugar solutions laced with the pesticides, scientists say, as a separate landmark field trial show neonicotinoids harm bee population

Bees may become addicted to nicotine-like pesticides in the same way humans get hooked on cigarettes, according to a new study, which was released as a landmark field trial provided further evidence that such neonicotinoids harm bee populations.

In a study published in the journal Nature, scientists from Newcastle Univeristy showed that bees have a preference for sugar solutions that are laced with the pesticides imidacloprid and thiamethoxam, possibly indicating they can become hooked on the chemicals.

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Categories: Science news

Tainted love: Bees prefer food laced with harmful pesticides

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-04-22 18:00
Rather than avoid neonicotinoid pesticides, bees opt specifically for sugars that contain the chemicals – even though they might be detrimental to wild bees







Categories: Science news

Falling meteor may have changed the course of Christianity

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-04-22 18:00
The early evangelist Paul became a Christian because of a dazzling light on the road to Damascus, but one astronomer thinks it was an exploding meteor







Categories: Science news

Wireless routers could spy on your breathing and heartbeat

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-04-22 17:00
A radar-like system that fits inside a Wi-Fi box can record health data and keep tabs on your mood – without you even noticing







Categories: Science news

Sydney storm erodes sandy beaches, giving a taste of the future

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-04-22 16:00
Shifting sands seen at Bondi and other beaches in Australia this week may worsen as sea levels rise, eroding sandy beaches there







Categories: Science news

Old Scientist: How biologists tussled over the Loch Ness monster

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-04-22 15:22
Half a century ago, the Loch Ness monster was something science was trying to get to the bottom of – as a running feud in the pages of New Scientist reveals







Categories: Science news

Oh please, Google Earth, must you ruin the Loch Ness monster for us?

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-04-22 14:42
Even more powerful than science’s capacity to explain is the human longing for mystery. So if Nessie is denied us, we’ll simply look elsewhere for fabled beasts Continue reading...
Categories: Science news

Do all spiral galaxies rotate in the same direction?

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-04-22 12:22
Readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts Continue reading...







Categories: Science news

The Vital Question by Nick Lane – a game-changing book about the origins of life

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-04-22 10:00

Why sex? Why then only two sexes? Why do we age and die? It’s the energy, stupid! This thinking is as important as the Copernican revolution

The “Origin of Life” is a conundrum that could once be safely consigned to wistful armchair musing – we’ll never know so don’t take it too seriously. You will probably imagine that it’s still safe to leave the subject in this speculative limbo, without very much in the way of evidence.

You’d be very wrong, because in the last 20 years, and especially the last decade, a powerful new body of evidence has emerged from genomics, geology, biochemistry and molecular biology. Here is the book that presents all this hard evidence and tightly interlocking theory to a wider audience.

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Categories: Science news

Record breaking clock invented which only loses a second in 15bn years

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-04-22 07:26

The ‘optical lattice’ device is now three times more accurate than previous incarnations

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Categories: Science news

The first world war scientists who gave their lives to defeat poison gas

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-04-22 07:00

On the hundredth anniversary of the first fatal use of chemical weapons, we look back at the scientists who risked their lives to fight a new enemy

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Categories: Science news

Astronaut watches and lunar probes: the space history sale – in pictures

Guardian Science - Tue, 2015-04-21 21:43

Items from the history of space and aviation went under the hammer at Bonhams, New York – including the first robotic probe to land on the moon

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Categories: Science news

E-cigarettes are smoke of choice for US schoolchildren

New Scientist - news - Tue, 2015-04-21 18:32
US high schoolers are opting for e-cigarettes over conventional cigarettes. Good news? Or have we just shifted the problem?







Categories: Science news

Thirty years in jail for a single hair: the FBI's 'mass disaster' of false conviction

Guardian Science - Tue, 2015-04-21 18:10

A ‘dirty bomb’ of pseudo-science wrapped up nearly 268 cases – perhaps hundreds more. Now begins the ‘herculean effort to right the wrongs’

George Perrot has spent almost 30 years in prison thanks to a single hair. It was discovered by an FBI agent on the bedsheet of a 78-year-old woman who had been raped by a burglar in her home in Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1985.

Perrot, then 17, was put on trial, despite the absence of physical evidence tying him to the crime scene. There was no semen. There was no blood. And so there was no way to conduct a conclusive DNA test.

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Categories: Science news

New gene therapy may cure childhood immune condition

Guardian Science - Tue, 2015-04-21 18:01

Successful trial could pave the way for similar techniques to be used for conditions such as sickle cell disease and thalassaemia

Children with a devastating immune condition appear to have been cured, after becoming the first to be given a new form of gene therapy.

Without the treatment, the patients who suffer from a rare condition called Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, faced short life expectancies and prolonged periods in hospital.

Related: HIV gene therapy using GM cells hailed a success after trial

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Categories: Science news
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