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Climate change will leave Christmas trees in hot water

New Scientist - news - Tue, 2014-12-16 13:18
Declining snowfall in winter will leave Norwegian spruce trees at the mercy of sub-zero temperatures and insect pests






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Geminid meteor shower: your pictures

Guardian Science - Tue, 2014-12-16 12:41

Guardian readers braved the cold and stayed up late to catch the annual Geminid meteor shower. There’s still time to share your own images via GuardianWitness

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The Week closes off comments to avoid 'acrimonious' hijackers

Guardian Science - Tue, 2014-12-16 11:17

Magazine loses patience with ‘pseudonymous commenters’ who indulge in ‘vitriolic personal insults’

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Handwriting vs typing: is the pen still mightier than the keyboard?

Guardian Science - Tue, 2014-12-16 11:08
Computers may dominate our lives, but mastery of penmanship brings us important cognitive benefits, research suggests Continue reading...
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Charles Darwin’s famous Galápagos Islands foundation faces extinction

Guardian Science - Tue, 2014-12-16 10:39
Forced closure of gift shop a cruel blow for world-renowned research organisation which has failed to adapt and survive

For years, the Charles Darwin Foundation’s Research Station on the Galápagos Islands, some 900km west of Ecuador, operated a small store to help it get by in lean times – selling mostly clothing with the foundation’s logo. But then it added swimsuits, sunglasses, Ecuadorian chocolate and artwork, and the local traders cried foul. The town’s mayor agreed and shut down the store.

Now the oldest and most prominent research organisation in the famed archipelago that inspired Darwin’s masterwork, On the Origin of Species, says that, as a result of the loss of the store, it is flat broke and could cease to exist.

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Prescribing ever more pills is bad for the public's health

Guardian Science - Tue, 2014-12-16 07:00

Doctors should not be judged on the volume of their prescribing but on its quality – ensuring that patients make informed choices about the potential risks and benefits

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Psychic Paula: let us test your pregnancy prediction powers

Guardian Science - Tue, 2014-12-16 07:00

Paula O’Brien claims she can predict the sex of unborn children. If true, this would force scientists to rethink the laws of biology and physics

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Donald Metcalf, leading cancer research scientist, dies at 85

Guardian Science - Tue, 2014-12-16 04:19

‘Father of modern haematology’ performed his last experiment in Melbourne in October, soon after he was diagnosed with metastatic pancreatic cancer

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How to think about… Fields

New Scientist - news - Tue, 2014-12-16 03:00
Gravity, electromagnetism, the Higgs field – even empty space isn't empty space because of these invisible webs that permeate reality (full text available to subscribers)






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I want to print personalised cancer drugs in a day

New Scientist - news - Mon, 2014-12-15 20:00
Biohacker Andrew Kessel's open-source drug company aims to make bespoke cancer-fighting viruses using DNA printers – paid for by a Netflix-style subscription (full text available to subscribers)






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Pretty vacant: What we're not seeing in graphics today

New Scientist - news - Mon, 2014-12-15 19:00
From explaining force-feeding at Guantanamo to rents in London, it takes storytellers and critical minds to make good infographics, as four new books show






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Glacial buzz saw takes mountains out at the knees

New Scientist - news - Mon, 2014-12-15 18:06
Why are mountains only as high as they are? Part of the answer is that their structural support is scoured away below the glacier line






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EU under pressure to ban diclofenac to protect Europe's vultures

Guardian Science - Mon, 2014-12-15 17:52

Veterinary drug for cattle that led to collapse of vulture populations of Asia is a risk to 55,000 birds, says European Medicines Agency

Pressure is mounting on Europe to immediately ban a drug used by vets which has been linked to the poisoning of vultures and other birds which feed on the corpses of cows treated with it.

The use of veterinary diclofenac, a pain-killing anti-inflammatory medecine given to livestock led to the unintentional but almost complete collapse of many vulture populations in Asia in 1990s and early 2000s. But a loophole in Europe allows it to be legally used in Spain and Italy where nearly all Europe’s estimated 55,000 vultures live.

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Today on New Scientist

New Scientist - news - Mon, 2014-12-15 17:30
All the latest on newscientist.com: how to think about computing, deep time, infinity, the big bang and probability, Lima, beyond the Turing test and more
Categories: Science news

Radio-controlled mouse hints at new diabetes treatment

New Scientist - news - Mon, 2014-12-15 16:46
Mice have been genetically altered to release insulin when hit with a burst of radio waves – an approach that could lead to diabetes management minus injections






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Tropical rainforests not absorbing as much carbon as expected, scientists say

Guardian Science - Mon, 2014-12-15 16:00

Findings could indicate some forests are not helping mitigate effects of climate change by removing excess carbon dioxide from atmosphere

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Greenland ice melt underestimated, study says

Guardian Science - Mon, 2014-12-15 16:00

Amount of land covered by supraglacial lakes on Greenland ice sheet will double by 2060, exacerbating melting as temperatures rise

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Dengue fever vaccine on the cards after novel antibody discovery

Guardian Science - Mon, 2014-12-15 16:00
The antibodies could be used to treat dengue fever or develop a vaccine that works against all four strains of virus

A new class of antibody found in the blood of patients with dengue fever has boosted hopes for a vaccine against the virus, which debilitates millions and kills tens of thousands each year.

Cases of dengue fever have soared in the past 50 years to nearly 100 million a year as improved transport and urbanisation have brought more people into contact with the mosquito-borne virus.

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How to think about… Mathematics

New Scientist - news - Mon, 2014-12-15 16:00
Mathematics has a fearsome reputation as the discipline of iron logic. But for its practitioners sometimes the best way to think clearly is to think vaguely (full text available to subscribers)






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Story of man and dagger found in UK field is finally told – 4,200 years on

Guardian Science - Mon, 2014-12-15 15:20
Twenty-three years after Racton Man was found, archaeologists realised his dagger was oldest bronze object ever found in UK

For more than 4,000 years a man lay buried in a corner of a Sussex field, far from the land of his childhood, holding a rare and precious object. Then for another 23 years he lay in a museum store until a chance conversation between two archaeologists led to the piecing together of his story: a man who died of a slashing sword wound and was buried holding his dagger, the oldest bronze object ever found in Britain and one of the oldest in Europe.

He was buried lying on his left side, with his hands clasping the dagger in front of his face. The dagger is an exceptionally rare type: the wooden hilt, long since rotted away, was ornamented with tiny studs, each a little masterpiece of ancient metalwork that when new would have gleamed like gold.

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