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Shapely photons break rules to fly slower than light

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2015-01-22 19:00
Light is the fastest thing around, but shaped beams travel slower than expected, even in a vacuum. No need to throw your physics textbooks out yet though






Categories: Science news

Anti-radiation drug could work days after exposure

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2015-01-22 18:45
A drug that protected mice three days after exposure to radiation could buy more time for survivors of a nuclear disaster






Categories: Science news

Dinosaur-killing impact recreated in mini BBQ

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2015-01-22 18:30
Did the meteorite blamed for wiping out the dinosaurs do it by igniting global firestorms of tremendous heat? Only one way to find out…






Categories: Science news

Today on New Scientist

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2015-01-22 17:30
All the latest on newscientist.com: meat the healthy way, world's riskiest nuclear site, Uber teaches city planners, "safer" GMOs, ultimate black and more






Categories: Science news

US Senate refuses to accept humanity's role in global climate change, again

Guardian Science - Thu, 2015-01-22 17:03

Senators accept global warming is not a hoax but fail to recognise human activity is to blame, nearly 27 years after scientists laid out man’s role

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Categories: Science news

Is it true that the pill causes brain tumours?

Guardian Science - Thu, 2015-01-22 16:22

Contraceptive use is very common, and brain tumours are very rare, so when a study finds an association between the two, understanding the risk is key

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Categories: Science news

Meteorite mineral named after beer is time capsule

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2015-01-22 15:55
The nitrogen in the breath you just took matches that in carlsbergite from a meteorite, which means it was probably formed at the same time as our solar system






Categories: Science news

AI might be a threat to humans but not for the reasons you think

Guardian Science - Thu, 2015-01-22 14:16

AI computers will benefit humanity – and fears that they might determine that the planet would prosper without us are unfounded. But machines needn’t be self-aware to pose a threat

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Categories: Science news

Lab-bound bacteria could lead to 'safer' GM organisms

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2015-01-22 11:30
Genetically modified E. coli have been created to survive only if they have access to unnatural amino acids, dying if they escape into the wild






Categories: Science news

'Three suns' appear over Mongolia in rare celestial phenomenon – video

Guardian Science - Thu, 2015-01-22 10:37
Three suns appear in the horizon over Mongolia, in an a rare celestial illusion. The middle sun is the actual star which appears daily in the sky, while the other two are smaller reflections. The phenomenon occurs in extremely cold temperatures when the sun's light reflects off snow crystals in the air Continue reading...






Categories: Science news

We're in for the long haul in UK's nuclear clean-up

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2015-01-22 10:00
Short-termism when the Sellafield nuclear plant was founded 50 years ago means the clean-up plan runs until 2120. Don't bet against that slipping further






Categories: Science news

Can politics keep up with the rise of high-tech cities?

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2015-01-22 09:00
Follow Stephen Goldsmith and Keller Easterling through the city of the future to find out who benefits from reprogramming our surroundings






Categories: Science news

Beppe Fiorello è Modugno all'Ambra Jovinelli - La Repubblica

Marcus du Sautoy news - Thu, 2015-01-22 08:02

La Repubblica

Beppe Fiorello è Modugno all'Ambra Jovinelli
La Repubblica
Il matematico inglese Marcus du Sautoy è la star di stasera al festival scientifico "L'ignoto" al Parco della Musica. La sua lectio magistralis esplorerà la natura irrazionale, caotica e incerta del mondo dei numeri. Dalla scoperta da parte degli ...

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Categories: Marcus du Sautoy

The world pays too high a price for cheap meat

New Scientist - news - Thu, 2015-01-22 08:00
Health worries won't curtail the growing global appetite for meat – perhaps environmental concerns will be more persuasive






Categories: Science news

How Is A Mathematical Proof Like Frodo's Journey In Lord Of The Rings? - io9

Marcus du Sautoy news - Thu, 2015-01-22 00:00

io9

How Is A Mathematical Proof Like Frodo's Journey In Lord Of The Rings?
io9
When people describe a story as being told in a "by the numbers" fashion, that's usually regarded as bad. But in a talk at Oxford University the other day, scientist Marcus du Sautoy argued that a great mathematical proof is a lot like a story. In fact ...

Categories: Marcus du Sautoy

Plants left at mercy of the wild weather

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-01-21 21:30
But look out for hazel catkins turning plump with pollen Continue reading...






Categories: Science news

Shocking state of world's riskiest nuclear waste site

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-01-21 21:00
Huge pools of mystery sludge, leaking silos and risk of explosions: Sellafield needs help, but the UK government has just sacked the firm running the clean-up






Categories: Science news

Uber's taxi data will help us understand our cities

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-01-21 20:30
Cities like Boston are slurping up data from private companies about how we live – and using it to improve services and transport






Categories: Science news

Dying star could be behind immensely powerful radio bursts 'heard' live

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-01-21 20:09

Astronomers may be one step closer to discovering origins of mysterious signals after detecting the millisecond-long blip live for the first time

A fleeting but immensely powerful celestial signal has been “heard” live for the first time, radio astronomers in Australia have announced, bringing scientists a step closer to discovering its mysterious origins.

“Fast radio bursts” last only milliseconds but produce more energy in that time than the sun does in 24 hours. Their source has baffled astronomers since 2007, when researchers first detected “a bright millisecond radio burst of extragalactic origin” buried in a 90-hour pulsar survey taken at the Parkes observatory in western New South Wales.

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Categories: Science news

Let them eat steak: How to eat meat the healthy way

New Scientist - news - Wed, 2015-01-21 20:00
Linked to all manner of illness and an eco-villain too – meat has an image problem. But the evidence says that smart diners can welcome it back to the menu (full text available to subscribers)






Categories: Science news
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