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Martian Magna Carta: Justice and freedom on the final frontier

New Scientist - news - Sun, 2015-05-17 20:00
The demands of living in space mean that extraterrestrial colonists won't enjoy the same liberties as us. It's time to draw up a new bill of rights for them (full text available to subscribers)







Categories: Science news

Cystic fibrosis treatment found to improve lives of sufferers in trials

Guardian Science - Sun, 2015-05-17 18:01

Combination of lumacaftor and ivacaftor modifies genetic defect that causes half of cases of disease that affects 10,000 UK children

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Ralph Lainson obituary

Guardian Science - Sun, 2015-05-17 16:20
Scientist whose studies in the Amazon region of Brazil led to significant discoveries about leishmaniasis and other parasitic diseases Continue reading...







Categories: Science news

Life before death: How dying affects living minds

New Scientist - news - Sun, 2015-05-17 13:00
Death shapes everything from individual lives to whole cultures, argue books by three social psychologists and an undertaker







Categories: Science news

Everyday drugs: The rise and fall of HRT

New Scientist - news - Sun, 2015-05-17 10:00
Hormone replacement therapy surged in the 1980s and 90s – then its reputation for disease prevention and safety crashed. So what's the safest way to take it? (full text available to subscribers)







Categories: Science news

New to nature No 141: Porophryne erythrodactylus

Guardian Science - Sun, 2015-05-17 07:00

This newly classified frogfish, which inhabits the subtidal waters of New South Wales, has two quite distinct colour phases and an atypical defence strategy

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Russian space rocket carrying Mexican satellite crashes in Siberia

Guardian Science - Sun, 2015-05-17 02:27

All launches of Proton-M carrier rockets of this type will be suspended, according to media reports

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Everyday drugs: The truth about testosterone

New Scientist - news - Sat, 2015-05-16 17:00
Millions of men take testosterone supplements. But is this the right way to regain youthful strength, vigour and libido? (full text available to subscribers)







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I'm building airships to fly over the Amazon

New Scientist - news - Sat, 2015-05-16 11:00
The rainforests of Brazil offer huge transport challenges, so Marcelo Felippes is developing a retro, greener approach







Categories: Science news

Gorilla holds out his hands for favourite treat - video

Guardian Science - Sat, 2015-05-16 09:54
Video from ZSL London Zoo shows Kumbuka, one of the zoo's western lowland gorillas, holding out his hand for his favourite snack, brown rice. London zoo's gorilla troop are very partial to the highly nutritious rice that keepers scatter over the enclosure to encourage the apes to forage Continue reading...







Categories: Science news

'You think I'm mad?' – the truth about psychosomatic illness

Guardian Science - Sat, 2015-05-16 07:00

Yvonne went blind overnight, Matthew couldn’t walk, Shahina lost the use of her hand – but doctors found nothing wrong. Were they faking it, or was the mind playing tricks? A neurologist on her most intriguing cases

I was a junior doctor when I encountered Yvonne. She was 40 and worked in a supermarket. One Tuesday she was reorganising produce in a refrigerated unit while a colleague cleaned the glass. Yvonne turned to talk to her just as she released a small spray of window cleaner. Yvonne felt the liquid splatter on her face and a burning in both eyes. Another colleague led her to the bathroom and washed her eyes with water. Yvonne was taken by ambulance to hospital, where she was examined and had her eyes bathed. Her husband was called, and by the time he arrived she was feeling better. Her eyes were red and full of tears, but she could see normally and the pain had lessened. Her husband took her home.

He told her not to go in to work the next day, and during the morning Yvonne noticed her vision blurring. By lunchtime, she was struggling to read the digital clock. Her husband and children came home that evening and encouraged her to have an early night. When Yvonne woke up and opened her eyes, everything was black. She cried out for help and heard the noise of people entering the room, but could not see them. She was completely blind.

I noticed increasingly that when she spoke, she looked me in the eye. It was more than a glance; I felt our eyes connect

Do you really think my daughter could hold her hand like this for weeks? She's in pain. I know my own child

I can't believe it! I came to this hospital with muscle spasm and now I'm being told I'm doing it on purpose

Fantastic news: none of his tests had shown evidence of MS. I could see his face darken and his wife's eyes roll

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Jane Hawking: ‘There were four of us in our marriage’

Guardian Science - Sat, 2015-05-16 06:15

Motor neurone disease and physics both played a part in her split from her husband Stephen Hawking, she says. She talks about the challenges they faced in their 30-year marriage and about how close The Theory of Everything was to reality

Here is Stephen Hawking’s verdict on the movie about his marriage: it needed more science. And here is Jane Hawking’s verdict: it needed more emotion. Those opposing views on The Theory of Everything, which brought Eddie Redmayne an Oscar and a Bafta for his portrayal of Stephen and Felicity Jones Oscar and Bafta nominations for her portrayal of Jane, reveal a great deal about not only the personalities of the world’s most famous scientist and his former wife, but also one of the major strands of difference in their relationship.

But the truth is that science is probably more absent from the film than emotion, because what the film represents is a triumph of Jane’s experience and persona after decades in which the family was viewed solely through the prism of Stephen’s genius, who as well as being the world’s best-known scientist is also the world’s best-known sufferer of motor neurone disease (MND).

Related: Dear Katie Hopkins. Stop making life harder for disabled people | Lucy Hawking

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Meet the cat-sized rodent named after James Bond

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2015-05-15 21:00
A newly discovered small mammal found in the Caribbean belongs to an endangered family







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Everyday drugs: The great statins debate

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2015-05-15 19:00
They're one of the most widely prescribed medicines in the world and save many thousands of lives each year – but the worries about side effects won't go away (full text available to subscribers)







Categories: Science news

Exact map of salmon journeys drawn from strontium in their ears

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2015-05-15 19:00
A small chunk of calcium carbonate known as an otolith in the ears of fish holds the key to tracing where they came from – and may be a boon for conservation







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Zoologger: The clumsy tree-dweller transforms into a gliding ace

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2015-05-15 17:58
Enormous skin flaps turn flying lemurs into aerial masters capable of manoeuvring through the forest with pinpoint accuracy







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Hundreds of heritage sites turn nocturnal for Museums at Night festival

Guardian Science - Fri, 2015-05-15 17:51

Public invited to experience museums and galleries across UK late at night as festival aims to celebrate diverse and quirky cultural landscape

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Bacteria on shoes could help forensic teams catch suspects

Guardian Science - Fri, 2015-05-15 16:28

Criminals beware: a new study has shown that germs on phones, shoes and other personal belongings can help trace a person’s whereabouts

This piece was first published on The Conversation

Prospective criminals should take note: bacteria are everywhere. A small pilot study has shown that the germs on personal belongings such as shoes and mobile phones are actually a useful way of tracing a person’s whereabouts – something that may prove useful in forensic investigations.

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Categories: Science news

The internet is running out of room – but we can save it

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2015-05-15 16:00
With more of us online, thirsty for media and information, we're nearing the maximum capacity of optical fibres, meaning the internet must adapt to survive







Categories: Science news

Our daily pills: What everyday drugs are really doing to you

New Scientist - news - Fri, 2015-05-15 15:15
Statins, aspirin, HRT… we used to take pills to make us better, but now we guzzle them to keep us well. What are the risks and rewards of preventive medicines?







Categories: Science news
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