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Smarter regulation for the sharing economy

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-05-20 07:00

Technology-based sharing platforms are touching more and more people’s lives, but policy and regulation can struggle to cope with new technologies. We need to rethink our notion of the sharing economy in order to make better regulation

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Categories: Science news

The doomsday vault: the seeds that could save a post-apocalyptic world

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-05-20 06:00

Set in an Arctic mountainside, the Svalbard seed bank contains the world’s most prized crops. But a row has erupted over whether this is the best hope of feeding the world after a catastrophe or just an overpriced deep freeze

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Categories: Science news

UK heritage sites to receive £98m lottery cash boost

Guardian Science - Wed, 2015-05-20 00:01

Lovell telescope and Lincoln Cathedral among recipients of bumper handout to preserve Britain’s scientific and technological history

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Categories: Science news

Air force prepares mini space plane for launch cloaked in mystery

Guardian Science - Tue, 2015-05-19 23:20

Unmanned X-37B flight, to depart from Cape Canaveral, is the fourth in a secretive programme and will carry Nasa and military experiments

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Categories: Science news

Your brain's unique response to words can reveal your identity

New Scientist - news - Tue, 2015-05-19 21:00
Reading a list of words provokes brain activity unique to an individual. This could lead to a more secure alternative to fingerprint recognition or iris scans







Categories: Science news

Mixed Messages: Are our genes and culture at cross purposes?

New Scientist - news - Tue, 2015-05-19 20:00
Why privilege genes over culture when people like South America's Mbaya, who eschew sex and pass on their culture through adoption, seem to argue the opposite?







Categories: Science news

Everyday drugs: What's the latest on aspirin?

New Scientist - news - Tue, 2015-05-19 18:00
First they said everyone should take it. Then they said healthy people shouldn't. Now it seems to protect against cancer. Here's how to weigh up the risks (full text available to subscribers)







Categories: Science news

2 ºC warming goal shaky as governments throw cash at fossil fuel

New Scientist - news - Tue, 2015-05-19 17:31
Shell is said to be preparing for a 4 ºC warmer world future, while governments keep subsidising fossil fuels with $5.3 trillion a year globally







Categories: Science news

Last chance plan to save world's rarest ape, the Hainan gibbon

New Scientist - news - Tue, 2015-05-19 17:20
There are only 25 individual Hainan gibbons left, but a new plan aims to turn the tide and save this unique ape







Categories: Science news

Iron levels in brain predict when people will get Alzheimer's

New Scientist - news - Tue, 2015-05-19 16:56
High levels of iron in the brain could hasten the onset of Alzheimer's disease. The finding could help identify people at risk







Categories: Science news

Innovation and equity in an age of gene editing

Guardian Science - Tue, 2015-05-19 16:24

As experts gather in Atlanta to discuss the rights and wrongs of editing human genomes, four of the attendees (Charis Thompson, Ruha Benjamin, Jessica Cussins and Marcy Darnovsky) explain why it is vital to put social justice at the heart of the debate.

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Categories: Science news

Vital antibiotics research needs radical new incentives

New Scientist - news - Tue, 2015-05-19 16:14
Pharmaceutical companies aren't developing antibiotics because there is little profit to be had – cue a radical solution to the problem







Categories: Science news

Hard to bear: pandas poorly adapted for digesting bamboo, scientists find

Guardian Science - Tue, 2015-05-19 15:40

Adding to their extinction woes, study finds pandas have a carnivorous digestive system and lack the gut flora for extracting maximum energy from plants

The panda’s woes are well-documented. Their habitat is shrinking, they are incredibly fussy eaters and they have an unusually lacklustre approach to sex.

Now scientists have discovered that the bears are also poorly adapted for digesting bamboo, despite the plant being almost the only thing they eat. The research shows that two million years after shifting to a herbivore lifestyle, the giant panda still has carnivore-like gut bacteria, which is better at breaking down protein.

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Categories: Science news

Secret US X-37B plane takes to the skies to experiment in space

New Scientist - news - Tue, 2015-05-19 13:00
Officials have lifted the lid on two experiments slated to fly aboard the X-37B this Wednesday







Categories: Science news

Science on stage: should playwrights respect history and truth? - The Guardian

Marcus du Sautoy news - Tue, 2015-05-19 12:58

The Guardian

Science on stage: should playwrights respect history and truth?
The Guardian
In a recent panel at the Royal Society discussing theatre and science, Marcus du Sautoy noted that too often science plays actually shy away from the science they are supposed to be presenting, or else get the science wrong. These are the kinds of ...

Categories: Marcus du Sautoy

Science on stage: should playwrights respect history and truth?

Guardian Science - Tue, 2015-05-19 12:58

Critics of science plays cannot accept that playwrights are free to depict real historical events and people as they like

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Categories: Science news

Ice hunters lasso an iceberg to turn it into vodka

New Scientist - news - Tue, 2015-05-19 12:00
Floating off the coast of Newfoundland, this massive chunk of ice is big business and will be sold to prestige mineral water and high-end vodka makers







Categories: Science news

Are we products of nature or nurture? Science answers age-old question

Guardian Science - Tue, 2015-05-19 08:38

Twin studies collated over the past 50 years reveal human traits and disease are almost equally determined by genetic and environmental factors

The age-old question of whether human traits are determined by nature or nurture has been answered, a team of researchers say. Their conclusion? It’s a draw.

By collating almost every twin study across the world from the past 50 years, researchers determined that the average variation for human traits and disease is 49% due to genetic factors and 51% due to environmental factors.

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Categories: Science news

Health and data: can digital fitness monitors revolutionise our lives?

Guardian Science - Tue, 2015-05-19 08:37
From granular microchips to voice analysis, health-tracking technology offers medical benefits but doubt persist about the quality and security of data gathered

From the instant he wakes up each morning, through his workday and into the night, the essence of Larry Smarr is captured by a series of numbers: a resting heart rate of 40 beats per minute, a blood pressure of 130/70, a stress level of 2%, weight of 87kg, 8,000 steps taken, 15 floors climbed, eight hours of sleep.

Smarr, an astrophysicist and computer scientist, could be the world’s most self-measured man. For nearly 15 years, the professor at the University of California at San Diego has been obsessed with what he describes as the most complicated subject he has ever experimented on: his own body.

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Categories: Science news

Case of the Rickety Cossack reveals unease about our fossil past

New Scientist - news - Tue, 2015-05-19 08:00
We are the sole evolutionary remnant of a big family: in a new book, Ian Tattersall wonders why thinking about our dead cousins makes us so uncomfortable







Categories: Science news
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